In 1847, Joseph Gabriel Mayer of Munich, Germany, sought to reignite the art of the Middle Ages Cathedral building trades. To do so, he adapted his Institute of Christian Art Works to include fine arts, sculpture, stained glass production, architecture, and painting. Both himself and his son in law Fanz Xavier Zettler, who would strike out on his own in 1870, transitioned the stained glass industry toward a sense of depth, realism, and color previously unknown. Together the duo developed the “Munich Style” of glass windows, bringing with it a cultural narrative of style and meaning, and achieving unprecedented success by painting the religious scenes (they predominantly worked on churches and Cathedrals) on large sheets of glass before fusing the glass through firing in…