“It is a guileless architecture, which, because innocent, is often apparently venerable; and which, because one may believe it to be uncorrupted, is sometimes curiously eloquent. When, as at Lockhart, it is combined with a city plan as entirely legitimate as that of the courthouse town; when, as there, a spontaneous and comprehensible architecture flourishes in a complementary relationship with a principle of authority; then we are in the presence, not of an amusing specimen of Americana, but of an exemplary urbanistic success whose meaning has been for too long obscured.” -Colin Rowe and John Hejduk, “Lockhart, Texas”     In the 1950s, a young architecture professor named Colin Rowe visited tiny Lockhart, Texas with his colleagues—all professors teaching at the University of Texas…