Even the most humble egg holds a secret. Golden center suspended, white delicate shell always in peril of cracking. Easter is the time of eggs–often brightly colored plastic, stuffed & hidden–their continence seeming an inferior simile to the famous Fabergé eggs that forever changed how we consider the Easter egg. The House of Fabergé reportedly only made 50 “Imperial” easter eggs in total, mostly for the Russian royal family as Easter gifts, of which only 43 survived. Peter Carl Fabergé worked between 1885 and 1917 and created some might argue the most iconic eggs of all time. The first egg was the “Hen egg” which was commissioned in 1885 and for Alexander III. It was for his wife, and he was so taken with the egg he placed a standing order for an egg…